50th Anniversary Event for Tektite II Mission 6

Tektite2020 is a mix of live central-stage presentations with Sea Space professionals and artists from around the globe. On July 17-18, 2020 your host Dr. Sarah Jane Pell with co-hosts Dr. Tierney Thys and Joe Grabowsky pay special tribute to the Tektite II Mission 6 all-women Aquanaut crew. Web content includes a Keynote panel with the original Aquanauts, reporting on the State of the Art in Sea Space exploration, hearing the calls for action, and discussing recommendations for the next 50years. Attendees share in knowledge, new perspectives and tools to transform the ocean world for a better future!

WHERE
Streaming Here & Facebook Live
Archived on Youtube

WHEN
Friday to Saturday
July 17 to 18, 2020 (EST)


Tektite and the Aquababes

Celebrating 50 years

Since time immemorial, outer space and the ocean have been sources of mystery and intrigue. We have long wondered what lies beyond our planet in the stars above and what lies below within the salty ocean waters. This quest brings together artists, scientists, engineers and visionaries. For the first time, on July 20, 1969, astronauts walked on the moon and looked back on Earth with new eyes. One year later in July 1970, an intrepid group of four scientists and an engineer became the first all-female team of aquanauts to live undersea for 10 days. 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of the momentous all female mission Tektite 2 Mission 6, the 51st anniversary of the Apollo landing, and the first time that a woman has reached the full ocean depth. We invite you to join us on 17th and 18th July in celebrating where women in sea and space have come in the past 50 years and where they are going in the next 50. With a phenomenal line-up of presenters, including the original Tektite all-female Aquanaut Team, and NASA Astronauts this event is not to be missed.


Deep below and far beyond

The next 50 years

On June 6th 2020, the first woman to walk in space also became the first woman to make a round-trip voyage to the Challenger Deep—the deepest part of the ocean. From Leonardo da Vinci’s sub sketches to later day diving bells and modern-day subs, our designs for diving deep have continually evolved. We haven’t just wanted to visit the depths: we have wanted to stay! We’ve wanted to persist long enough to experience and explore the undersea world. Eventually in the early 1960s, scientists began conducting saturation diving experiments. They wanted to test human ability to live in specially designed submerged habitats for days, even months, at a time. This research would lay essential groundwork not only for extended undersea living but also for extended living in outer space. We celebrate the work of these pioneering men and women. Their work inspires us to look to the future and ask what can we learn?


Dive in!

Join us on this incredible adventure. Mission celebrations will start in

Conference Schedule*

50 Sessions celebrating 50 Years (*subject to change)
  • July 17, 2020

    Splash Down! The deep dive and immersion

  • 08:30 - 09:00
    A heroes welcome for our Honoured Guest Aquanauts of the 1970s Tektite II Mission 6 first all-women crew, distinguished Pioneering Women of Sea and Space, and global community gathered in celebration across planet Earth.
    Culture
    Live Online
    Zoom 1, Official Opening

  • 09:00 - 10:30
    Meet the original crew! Tektite II became the first real underwater laboratory (VanDerwalker, 1971). The program allowed 53 marine scientists in eleven missions to live and work on the seafloor for periods ranging from two to four weeks. One unique feature of Tektite II was the inclusion of an all-female aquanaut team [Mission 6]. Members were selected in the same manner as other aquanauts with respect to diving experience, scientific training and physical condition. The women aquanauts performed admirably in carrying out their scientific mission, using the equipment and maintaining the habitat (Earle, 1971). No problems were noted either medically or otherwise to separate female aquanauts from their male counterparts. Their fine performance paved the way for the routine inclusion of female aquanauts in future undersea missions and female astronauts in space missions. This is their story. See: James W. Miller and Ian G. Koblick (1995) Living and Working in the Sea.
    Exploration
    Science
    Engineering
    Live Online
    Zoom 1, TEKTITE Keynote

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    The characteristics of curiosity and imagination drive individual and collective exploration beyond human or terrestrial space. We engineer and design systems for survival, propulsion, and immersion in hostile alluring worlds. Evolution takes time, so we are aquatic and extra-terrestrial for a moment. A magnifiscent moment. A moment long enough to be…
    Exploration
    Culture
    Live Online
    Zoom 2, Keynote Panel

  • 12:30 - 13:00
    Sonic Reef is a call to action to protect the Great Barrier Reef, one of the greatest natural wonders of the world. This immersive sound installation launched at World Science Festival 2017 and draws on scientific recordings from the reef that showcase the value of sound in understanding ecosystem health. Sonic Reef is a research project led by Dr Leah Barclay and developed in collaboration with the Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Australian Marine Conservation Society, JASCO Applied Sciences and a team of passionate artists, scientists and conservationists.
    Culture
    Live Online
    Zoom 1, Splash Dance Performance

  • 14:30 - 16:00
    From building instruments to study marine invertebrate ecomechanics, to building underwater museums, these scientists and activists are looking at the wonders of the deep, and upward to discover new ways to forge new connections between human populations and natural environments to help address social and environmental challenges.
    Science
    Culture
    Live Online
    Zoom 1, Keynote Panel

  • 16:00 - 17:00
    Panalists consider the observations of Pierre Auger, the first President of the French Space Agency (CNES) : Many scientists, he wrote, would like to call for a sort of moratorium of science fiction, and tell science fiction writers: Hold it right there, stop giving away what we are going to do. Every time the scientists make a fresh breakthrough, the public are already used to the idea. They do not find new discoveries astonishing any more, and it is a pity? Is there really a future for space exploration or should we see the 1960s as a space oddity?
    Exploration
    Engineering
    Live Online
    Zoom 1, OCEAN Keynote

  • July 18, 2020

    Splash Up! The ascent to the new world

  • 09:00 - 09:10
    Stand by.
    Culture
    Performance Video
    Zoom 2, Opening

  • 09:00 - 10:30
    With space applications and technologies we can monitor climate change and pollution, survey oceans and marine life, observe coastal erosion and weather patterns, respond to disaters and public health emergencies, connect remote communities, and enable smart systems from transportation to communication, towards sustainable economic and social development, and ethical environmental custodianship.
    Science
    Engineering
    Live Online
    Zoom 2, Keynote Panel

  • 11:00 - 12:30
    This panel shares new intiatives for global access, engagement and empowerment - from the lounge room to the launch site - to awaken and educate civilians in many new forms of planetary custodianship. Our citizenry is drawn to the sea and space because of the immense beauty, and for the mystery this stir in us. We are desiring to discover something extraordinary, sublime and enlightening. The questions about what is out there, or down there; has tickled our imaginations and triggered our curiosity and a desire to go there. As we learn more, we understand that all systems are entwined, essential and fragile. This awareness brings profound responsibility. Our mission to the stars as envoys, and the depths as custodians, must continue to stimulate us to care more, and to keep exploring and discovering. Community and commercial-led civilian sea and space activities are bringing new actors to the game.
    Exploration
    Culture
    Live Online
    Zoom 2, Keynote Panel

  • 12:30 - 13:00
    The artistic mission of Sue Austin is to challenge ideas around what is possible for disabled people. She has invented and patented an underwater wheelchair to perform undersea. "People say about diving, it's like flying. But this — it's in another dimension altogether."
    Culture
    Live Online
    Zoom 2, Splash Dance #2

  • 13:30 - 15:00
    Earths last undersea lab is a proving ground for future astronauts. Florida's Aquarius Reef Base is remote, cramped, and potentially dangerous - that's why it is the perfect space analogue and test station for undersea custodianship trials. This session takes us on a journey into life inside the habitat, out in the water, and top-side to the Mission Command and CapComm operations today. We discuss the NEEMO (NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation) undersea missions - including the first all-women crew, and the longest stay, and the expansion of operations for citizen-led private missions. Outcomes will help us set the intention for a future mission planned by the event organisers in collaboration with many of the speakers. Announcement to follow.
    Exploration
    Science
    Live Online
    Zoom 2, Keynote Panel

  • 15:30 - 17:00
    Meh synth Schlitz, tempor duis single-origin coffee ea next level ethnic fingerstache fanny pack nostrud. Photo booth anim 8-bit hella, PBR 3 wolf moon beard Helvetica. Salvia esse nihil, flexitarian Truffaut synth art party deep v chillwave.
    Exploration
    Science
    Live Online
    Zoom 2, FINAL KEYNOTE

Join the Splash Down!

Experience the conference wherever you are. Tune in live for the keynotes and watch sessions on demand. Also be sure to join our event.